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You keep sending resumes for the jobs you want, but you’re not getting any responses? You have relevant experience and skills for those positions, but something is wrong. What’s missing? It’s time for the realization: you’re not getting the calls because the resume isn’t impressive. When writing about ourselves, we just think the content is perfect. We’re confident in our expertise and we just list dry data in the resume, thinking that the hiring manager will get the point. Camelia Moore, a resume writer from UK writing service , explains: “Dry lists of educational and work experience seem perfectly fine to most job applicants. That’s what the resume is for, after all, right? However, an experienced recruiter or hiring manager will find such a resume boring. They are looking at dozens of those applications every single day. All of the applicants seem the same. If you don’t offer something beyond the same old expressions, you won’t be noticed.” That was pretty straightforward, right? You can’t expect the cliches to work. The competition for every single position on the market is extreme. When you’re writing a resume for the military, there’s not much space for creativity. A civilian job, however, demands a more flexible approach. This is the main rule to keep in mind: don’t make the reader bored . Now, onto our main point: are there any particular cliches you should be avoiding? There sure are! We’ll list 10 expressions that can ruin your resume. Most talented person, greatest discipline, best worker Do not exaggerate! The resume should convey your skills and interests, as well as your personality. You may think you’re the best applicant, but let the hiring manager be the judge of that. After all, you have no idea who the other applicants are, so how can you claim to be the best one? Be realistic. This should be a serious resume that presents you as a true professional. Rock star I’m a rock star achiever with awesome creativity skills. Do you notice what’s wrong with that sentence? It’s not creative. People have been using phrases like kick-butt and rock star so much that they became absolute cliches. Maybe the terms would be suitable for someone applying for a job in graphic design, marketing, or another creative niche. However, even the hiring managers for those jobs are getting tired of such forced creativity.   Attention to details A detailed-oriented person or a person with great attention to details - those are phrases that you’ll find in almost every resume template. That’s exactly what’s wrong: everyone is using them. You’ll want to find a more creative way to mention your ability to notice and focus on details.  High GPA No one cares. If you just graduated, it’s okay to mention the high GPA, since you lack job experience the hiring manager can evaluate. Otherwise, just emphasize your experience with military and civilian jobs and responsibilities. Don’t put the focus on education; that’s not what most employers are interested in. Great in teamwork I am an inspired team player. I am great in teamwork with all staff levels. Just… no. This is one of the most obvious resume fillers: when you don’t know what to say, say you’re a team player. Instead of telling these things with words, you should show you’re a good team player. Just mention team projects you contributed to and explain what they taught you. Strong discipline I am a worker with strong discipline. I have strong work ethics. These phrases are not convincing. They are just statements. Instead of using them as fillers in the resume, simply explain the situations where you showed discipline and work ethics. Advanced communication skills What does it mean to have advanced communication skills , anyway? How advanced are there? Is there a scale? Skip this part. You don’t have to claim you have great communication skills. The hiring manager has the whole resume and cover letter to evaluate them. If you want to be specific, you can list experiences that put you in direct communication with different categories of people. Do you have experience in maintaining social media accounts? That’s an important communication skill to mention, too. References will be provided on request This is what this looks like in the eyes of a potential employer: “If you like what you see, make an effort to find out more about me. If not, who cares!” The hiring manager won’t appreciate being forced to ask for references. You should always provide them with your job application, just in case. Result-driven person I am a result-driven person. I’m always on schedule and I work hard to meet goals. This is a vague statement that doesn’t prove anything. Anyone could say the same thing about themselves, but that won’t make it true. This expression is present in almost all resumes that hiring managers get. It’s an obvious filler and it doesn’t make you look good. Motivated leader I am a highly motivated leader. I’ve been part of Red Cross missions since 2012. The teams that I led managed to get donations for restoring the homes of over 100 families and 400 individuals. What do you think: which one of these statements shows a motivated leader? Of course it’s the second one. The first one is a vague, egocentric statement. The second one is an example that shows. Get rid of the phrases that tell and switch them with experiences that show . That’s the main lesson to learn when you want to craft the perfect resume.   Now you know: some of the most common phrases that applicants use in resumes simply don’t work. When an employer sees such cliches, they get the impression that the applicant is boring and uncreative. The fact that such resumes are based on templates is obvious. Fortunately, you came across this article before sending the resume. If you already wrote it, polish it out and get rid of the above-listed statements. Remember: it’s always wise to get a second opinion. We can’t be absolutely unbiased when judging the quality of our own resumes.   Joan Selby is a content marketer and passionate blogger . Former teacher and fancy shoelover. A writer by day and reader by night. Find her on Twitter and Facebook .
Being targeted by more than one employer at the same time means that you’re already above average. Having multiple jobs offers to choose from is definitely a luxury, and definitely, a good thing to have in your professional life. But, the truth is that beyond the variety, the possibility to choose, and all the positive aspects that come along, the decision that you make is critical. It’ll influence your nearest future big time, so you need to make a smart choice . During today’s post, we’re going to discuss a few strategies that’ll help you make good decisions whenever you need to choose between two or more offers. Pay attention and remember to apply this in real life. Reading it and skipping it won’t get you any help.  Dig as Deep as You Can If you truly care about your future, you can never choose a job before digging deep. The first thing you need to do is scout the company as well as you can. Analyze their Facebook profile, their website, and their testimonials/reviews. Once you do that, I’d suggest going even deeper and contacting different people that have worked there before . You can get their contacts from the employer, as a good employer wouldn’t be bothered if you’d talk to his former employees. Do the same with each company, and take your time. If you move fast, you finish this process in a matter of days. The information you’ll find is definitely going to influence your decision.  Determine Your Most Important Priorities It’s very important to figure out what matters most to you. Throughout our lives, we go through different developmental processes, so we obviously have different needs. Moreover, there are many instances in which you’re forced to work because of certain issues that pop into your life. We got in touch with Reina Hutchins, HR Manager at ResumesPlanet , and asked her for a little advice: “When it comes to evaluating the factors that matter the most to you, make sure that you avoid this common mistake : Most of the times, individuals that have to choose between multiple job offers will choose the one with the highest pay. As the time goes on, even if they cash in little extra cash, they become unfulfilled with their lives. Why? Because they’re not enjoying what they’re doing. They chose money over passion, so they ended up miserable.” If the situation truly requires it and you’re obliged to generate more income, putting yourself through a rough but profitable time is not a bad idea. After all, you need to solve a problem, and the job that pays the best is your best chance of doing it.  Which Job Gives You the Most Professional Development Opportunities? Professional growth is definitely a factor that weights a lot when choosing between more jobs. Successful people understand that their career successes don’t happen overnight. It takes work, consistency, patience, and the right job. If your job doesn’t offer you enough growth opportunities, you’re going to be stuck for a portion of your life. Once you get stuck, you’ll enter a comfort zone state , and everything will seem harder. Make sure that you avoid this happening by giving yourself time to think about your possible opportunities. Define these opportunities for your own situation – how do they look like, when will they show up, and which job gives you the most chances of reaching them? I’d say that this is the biggest factor to consider, but each and every one of us is different. I believe that happiness comes with progress, and progress without opportunities is pretty hard to get.  Visually Inspect and Feel Your Future Jobs In order to get a better understanding of what would it mean to work at Job X or Job Z, you need to imagine yourself working there already. Start to imagine the things around you. Think about the people that’ll be there, imagine your boss, and try to feel what you would feel if you were actually sitting in that place. Do this with each job, and take your time to actually enter that state. Our brains cannot differentiate the real from the imaginary. We believe it does, but it actually doesn’t . That means that we can actually trick it into believing something that we want to believe and use the results when choosing the best offer. Now, in order for this to be efficient, you need to do your homework and dig deeper into what each company does and how each company looks like from the inside. If you do not hold this information in your brain, it’ll be real hard to actually visualize and feel the job. Conclusion Making the right choice is essential for a faster and more efficient professional growth. It’s always important to take the time to think, judge, analyze, and ultimately decide what you want to do with your life. These situations should never be neglected, as they represent critical and fast changes in your lifestyle. With time, you’ll get better at it. The 5 th time you’re choosing between jobs you’ll already know what to do, and you’ll do it
You decided to get a job in the civil sector? This is an important transition you’re making. It will change your entire lifestyle. Before you get to that point, though, you have to apply to jobs. Although the process seems easy, it’s trickier than you anticipate. There’s growing competition in every sector. You have to prove yourself as a person who will be a valuable addition to the specific organization you’re aiming for. Big bosses want only outstanding workers. You would have the same approach if you had your own company, right? The resume is pretty straightforward. Monica Daniels from BestEssays explains: “Although creative resumes are a big trend, the information you put there stays the same. You share your job experience, education, and skills. The cover letter, on the other hand, allows for greater flexibility. It lets you show your personality. That’s why it’s an important part of the job application process.” There is no certain recipe for writing an impeccable cover letter. However, there are few approaches that will help you make it attractive. Today, we’ll focus on 5 important tips you should keep in mind when writing your cover letter. Try them and don’t forget to share your impressions.   Make It Personal   Why do employers need cover letters, anyway? - They want to understand your personality. Each organization has a unique vibe. A hiring manager wants to see how you would fit into that culture. The resume gives some hints, but it’s not enough for an employer to form an impression about your personality. That’s why you have to pay close attention to the way you write the cover letter. “Make it personal.” That sounds like a simple tip, right? In reality, it’s not an easy thing to do. Think of a particular experience that can impress the employer. Since you’re a veteran, you must have tons of such events to share. Pick one and explain how you acted as a disciplined, reliable person. Show your creativity, too. It’s okay to use vivid language and exaggerate a tiny bit. However, it’s never okay to lie. A hiring manager can notice when a cover letter is written with passion. A lie never sounds passionate. Don’t tell; show ! The experience you share should show what kind of person you are. You can’t say “I am a responsible, kind, and communicative person” in a cover letter and expect an interview. Don’t get too emotional. That’s an extreme you want to avoid.     Make a Point   A hiring manager doesn’t have too much time to spend with a single cover letter. They will probably give you less than 5 minutes, so the letter should make a clear point during that time. You’ll achieve that goal through clarity, brevity, and relevance. Keep the cover letter within a single page. The sole glance at a long letter discourages a hiring manager. Grab the attention with the introduction. Don’t make it vague. Get straight to the point and explain what makes you better than other applicants. Don’t repeat the same things from your resume. The hiring manager will use the resume to get information about your experience and skills. Remember the first tip? The cover letter is all about your personality.   Make It Flawless   You have to edit the letter before sending the application. A single flaw in grammar, spelling, or sentence structure will ruin the impression. The wrong choice of words is also problematic. Maybe this position has nothing to do with writing, but your writing skills convey your intelligence, professionalism, and attention to detail. Start with the big picture. Are there any gaps in your story? Maybe you went overboard somewhere? Did you make a clear point? Once you’re sure the content is okay, pay attention to the grammar. You don’t want too much passive voice in your text. Whenever possible, change those points with active voice. Make it readable. Get rid of complicated words and cut on the adjectives. Clear, straightforward expression makes you look like a true professional. You already learned that lesson in the military, didn’t you. If you can’t handle the editing part, you can always hire an online service to do that for you.   Send It Via Email   Most ads leave you with two choices: send the application via email or apply directly through the organization’s website. Email is better. First of all, you’ll be sure you sent the application and nothing went wrong with the system. If you get no answer, you can send a follow-up message in the same thread, so the hiring manager will immediately see your resume. The email also makes it easy for the HR department. All recruiters know how to use email, but the system at the website may be new to them. They are used to getting email messages, so it’s okay to stick to tradition.   Send the Cover Letter in the Message, and the Resume in the Attachment   Your first instinct will tell you to attach both the cover letter and resume in the email message. You should do that only if the ad specifically tells you to do so. If not, it’s better to copy and paste the content of your cover letter in the body of your message, and attach the resume along. If you send two attachments, the hiring manager will probably go straight to the resume. If it’s not impressive, they won’t even proceed to the cover letter. If they see a great cover letter first, though, they will approach the resume with positive mindset. The cover letter is a short presentation of yourself. Don’t forget to include a signature with all your contact information in this message, so it will be easy for the hiring manager to reach you. An awesome cover letter can save even a mediocre resume. That’s why you want them to see it first. Plus, this method saves you from thinking: “What on earth should I write in the body of this message if I attach both documents?” Are You Ready? Take the cover letter very seriously. For some hiring managers, it’s the most important part of the application. They should see a person they would like to interview. It’s your chance to convey your great personality through it. Hopefully, the tips above will help you make a good impression.   Joan Selby is a content marketer and passionate blogger . Former teacher and fancy shoelover. A writer by day and reader by night. Find her on Twitter and Facebook .        
It is absolutely amazing how much our military and our veterans do and have done for our country. They continue to serve us daily with a great love for their country. Veterans have a rich history in our country, for which you can read more here , but they are also making history every day out in the workforce. Many vets face challenges when it comes to integrating into the civilian workforce. They have a wide set of skills, and some that simply do not transfer over. For example, Marine Corps engineers like Christopher Pascale (author of War Poems) are great at looking for roadside bombs, but that is not something most interviewers can appreciate in terms of him being a great banker or salesman - two jobs that don't make the list for vets in general. However, there are some terrific jobs for veterans. Teaching Most veterans are comfortable talking in front of crowds. This comes from having to speak up frequently in groups of 30 or more. Some give what are called "hip pocket classes," which are impromptu courses on a subject they have either prepared, or are knowledgeable about, such as patrolling, weapons safety, or how to save for retirement. Government Administration As veterans rise up in the NCO and officer ranks they have to do paperwork. Some makes things more efficient, and others don't. However, they understand that following the process in place is the first step toward being able to understand it, and maybe making it more efficient. While most people would hate government admin work, and would also hate the pay scale this would be different for veterans. Veterans would understand the process, be used to the concept of being in a job that will keep them from being poor - even if they'll never be rich - and will also appreciate benefits like accumulating large amounts of sick and leave time, which starts at a total of 26 days per year! Management With just 1-2 years in the military veterans are given some kind of experience as a fire team leader in charge of 3 other people. What's more, veterans are used to having team members that they cannot fire, and therefore have to help be better. Student After spending between 4-30 years doing many things they may not have wanted to veterans fully embrace the idea of studying what they want in school. Add in the GI Bill that pays their tuition, and then pays them tax-free cash, and the incentive is even bigger. This is likely why veterans have higher GPAs than their classmates. There are many opportunities for veterans in the workforce. While some will make fantastic lawyers, accountants, and engineers we believe these professions will suit them extremely well.
You made it! You applied for a job with an awesome resume that highlighted your experience in the military and showed you’re ready for the next step. You got the call you’ve been waiting for. The interview is scheduled soon, so you don’t have much time to prepare. Most people will try to calm you down with the same old advice: “Just be yourself.” Yes, that’s a nice starting point, but you need something more than that. You need to look as a great professional that everyone would want in their company. The resume informed the employer about your training, skills and knowledge. Now, it’s all about character. The impression you make is crucial. The first thing you can do is search for tips on how to make the interviewer fall in love with you . You’ll easily figure out what you need to do: pick a professionally-looking outfit, give them a firm handshake, and stay calm and confident while answering the questions. Let’s take the instructions a bit further today. We’ll go through 12 common mistakes that make veterans look unprofessional at interviews. We’ll also tell you how to avoid those pitfalls.   Being Late   Come on; you were in the military! They expect you to be there right on time. Running late means you have poor management skills. However, being late also shows your disrespect for the organization that invited you for an interview. Of course you don’t want to be late and you do your best to arrive on time. However, you should always consider potential obstacles, such as a messy traffic, an important phone call, or an emergency situation with your family members. Be mentally prepared for the interview. Go to bed early, so you’ll get enough sleep. When you wake up on the day of the interview, repeat to yourself: “nothing will make me late.” Whoever calls you and whatever happens, you shouldn’t be prevented from leaving early for the interview. If there’s an extreme emergency, call the company as soon as possible and ask them to reschedule the interview.   Not Being Ready   You figure you’ll just go with the flow ? You already have what it takes, so you’ll just answer few questions and get that job? You’re wrong. The interviewer will want to see what you know about the company in question. They will ask you how you see yourself in that environment and how you’ll make it better. Make sure to do your research on the organization’s mission, values, and current projects. Just explore the about us page from the official website and you’ll be fine.     Taking Coffee With You   You need that coffee too bad? You don’t need it during the actual interview. If you need the energy, have coffee before you head off to the interview. Getting in there with a cup of coffee in your hand will make you look highly unprofessional.   Too Much or No Makeup   This tip goes for women only: if you wear too much makeup on an interview, you won’t look like a professional. Try to find “behind the scenes” photos from that organization. Observe the style of the women who work there and try to fit in. It’s equally unprofessional to appear there with no makeup at all. That makes you look like you didn’t invest any effort. Here is a safe bet: put minimal makeup on. Cover the dark circles under your eyes, so you won’t look tired. Use high-quality products that won’t melt under the pressure. You might sweat and you don’t want the foundation to melt on you.   Smoking   Don’t smoke before getting in that office. Whether you like it or not, smokers face professional discrimination. Employers prefer non-smokers because they don’t need frequent breaks to nurture a bad habit. Plus, they smell better. No, we’re not saying you have to quit smoking before you start applying for jobs. We’re just saying you shouldn’t smell like cigarettes when you get there.   Too Much Body Language   You might get so nervous during an interview that you’ll be clicking a pen without or scratching your head without even noticing it. You may also shake your legs or explain things with your hands a tad too much. That shows you’re stressed out and not entirely present in the moment. You don’t want to be stiff, but you don’t need too much body language either. Breathe! Control yourself!   Saying Bad Things about Your Previous Employer   Did you just quit a job that was not the right match for you? Did the boss treat you bad? Did you just come out of military because of a bad experience? Don’t talk about it during the interview. We all have horror stories from previous workplaces. The potential employer will be interested in them, but they won’t form a good impression for a person who complains too much. Chances are, you’ll probably get some of these questions:   Why did you quit the military? Why weren’t you satisfied with your previous job?   Just say that you gave everything you had to give during those previous experiences. You felt like those position no longer gave you space for progress, so now you are ready for something better.   Wearing Too Much Perfume   Of course you want to make a good impression with your favorite scent . The right dose of perfume sure makes you look professional. However, it has to be subtle. Do you want to leave the office smelling like you for hours after you leave? No. Pick a subtle scent that doesn’t cause a headache to most people. Be very moderate with it; a single spritz should be enough.   Failing to Respect the Company’s Dress Code   You have to dress for the job you want. That doesn’t mean picking the fanciest pieces from your closet and the most expensive shoes you own. It means dressing in a way that works for that particular organization. If, for example, you’re applying for a position in a non-governmental organization that does a lot of field work, casual style will be okay. You don’t want to wear a suit to such an interview. If, on the other hand, you’re applying for a traditional office job, ditch the baggy clothes and wear something sleek. Try to find out how the people who work there dress. Pick clothes that will fit in that environment, but will still make you feel like yourself.   Interrupting the Interviewer   Maybe they will make wrong conclusions about you and you’ll want to set things straight. Maybe you’ll predict the question before they finish it and you’ll want to cut through the chaise. Don’t do it! Allow the interviewer to finish the sentence before you speak up. Be patient!    Too Much or No Eye Contact   If you don’t make eye contact, you’ll seem like an unconfident person that no one wants in their organization. No eye contact may also convey lack of interest in this particular position. However, that doesn’t mean you shouldn’t take your eyes off the interviewer. You’re not trying to intimidate them by looking in their eyes without blinking. Keep the eye contact casual and relaxed.     Wrong Posture   Curving your back forward makes you look unconfident. Crossing your arms shows you’re setting limits and you’re not very interested in the discussion. Sitting in a stiff position means you’re not relaxed. You want to sit with your back straight, but shoulders relaxed. A slight lean forward when you talk shows you’re interested in the conversation. Hiring managers pay a lot of attention to these body signs, so you want to leave a good impression through your posture.     Are you ready? You’re ready! If you avoid the mistakes listed above, you’ll do just fine during the interview.    Joan Selby is a content marketer at SuperiorPapers and passionate blogger. Former teacher and fancy shoelover. A writer by day and reader by night. Find her on Twitter and Facebook . You made it! You applied for a job with an awesome resume that highlighted your experience in the military and showed you’re ready for the next step. You got the call you’ve been waiting for. The interview is scheduled soon, so you don’t have much time to prepare. Most people will try to calm you down with the same old advice: “Just be yourself.” Yes, that’s a nice starting point, but you need something more than that. You need to look as a great professional that everyone would want in their company. The resume informed the employer about your training, skills and knowledge. Now, it’s all about character. The impression you make is crucial. The first thing you can do is search for tips on how to make the interviewer fall in love with you . You’ll easily figure out what you need to do: pick a professionally-looking outfit, give them a firm handshake, and stay calm and confident while answering the questions. Let’s take the instructions a bit further today. We’ll go through 12 common mistakes that make veterans look unprofessional at interviews. We’ll also tell you how to avoid those pitfalls.   Being Late   Come on; you were in the military! They expect you to be there right on time. Running late means you have poor management skills. However, being late also shows your disrespect for the organization that invited you for an interview. Of course you don’t want to be late and you do your best to arrive on time. However, you should always consider potential obstacles, such as a messy traffic, an important phone call, or an emergency situation with your family members. Be mentally prepared for the interview. Go to bed early, so you’ll get enough sleep. When you wake up on the day of the interview, repeat to yourself: “nothing will make me late.” Whoever calls you and whatever happens, you shouldn’t be prevented from leaving early for the interview. If there’s an extreme emergency, call the company as soon as possible and ask them to reschedule the interview.   Not Being Ready   You figure you’ll just go with the flow ? You already have what it takes, so you’ll just answer few questions and get that job? You’re wrong. The interviewer will want to see what you know about the company in question. They will ask you how you see yourself in that environment and how you’ll make it better. Make sure to do your research on the organization’s mission, values, and current projects. Just explore the about us page from the official website and you’ll be fine.     Taking Coffee With You   You need that coffee too bad? You don’t need it during the actual interview. If you need the energy, have coffee before you head off to the interview. Getting in there with a cup of coffee in your hand will make you look highly unprofessional.   Too Much or No Makeup   This tip goes for women only: if you wear too much makeup on an interview, you won’t look like a professional. Try to find “behind the scenes” photos from that organization. Observe the style of the women who work there and try to fit in. It’s equally unprofessional to appear there with no makeup at all. That makes you look like you didn’t invest any effort. Here is a safe bet: put minimal makeup on. Cover the dark circles under your eyes, so you won’t look tired. Use high-quality products that won’t melt under the pressure. You might sweat and you don’t want the foundation to melt on you.   Smoking   Don’t smoke before getting in that office. Whether you like it or not, smokers face professional discrimination. Employers prefer non-smokers because they don’t need frequent breaks to nurture a bad habit. Plus, they smell better. No, we’re not saying you have to quit smoking before you start applying for jobs. We’re just saying you shouldn’t smell like cigarettes when you get there.   Too Much Body Language   You might get so nervous during an interview that you’ll be clicking a pen without or scratching your head without even noticing it. You may also shake your legs or explain things with your hands a tad too much. That shows you’re stressed out and not entirely present in the moment. You don’t want to be stiff, but you don’t need too much body language either. Breathe! Control yourself!   Saying Bad Things about Your Previous Employer   Did you just quit a job that was not the right match for you? Did the boss treat you bad? Did you just come out of military because of a bad experience? Don’t talk about it during the interview. We all have horror stories from previous workplaces. The potential employer will be interested in them, but they won’t form a good impression for a person who complains too much. Chances are, you’ll probably get some of these questions:   Why did you quit the military? Why weren’t you satisfied with your previous job?   Just say that you gave everything you had to give during those previous experiences. You felt like those position no longer gave you space for progress, so now you are ready for something better.   Wearing Too Much Perfume   Of course you want to make a good impression with your favorite scent . The right dose of perfume sure makes you look professional. However, it has to be subtle. Do you want to leave the office smelling like you for hours after you leave? No. Pick a subtle scent that doesn’t cause a headache to most people. Be very moderate with it; a single spritz should be enough.   Failing to Respect the Company’s Dress Code   You have to dress for the job you want. That doesn’t mean picking the fanciest pieces from your closet and the most expensive shoes you own. It means dressing in a way that works for that particular organization. If, for example, you’re applying for a position in a non-governmental organization that does a lot of field work, casual style will be okay. You don’t want to wear a suit to such an interview. If, on the other hand, you’re applying for a traditional office job, ditch the baggy clothes and wear something sleek. Try to find out how the people who work there dress. Pick clothes that will fit in that environment, but will still make you feel like yourself.   Interrupting the Interviewer   Maybe they will make wrong conclusions about you and you’ll want to set things straight. Maybe you’ll predict the question before they finish it and you’ll want to cut through the chaise. Don’t do it! Allow the interviewer to finish the sentence before you speak up. Be patient!    Too Much or No Eye Contact   If you don’t make eye contact, you’ll seem like an unconfident person that no one wants in their organization. No eye contact may also convey lack of interest in this particular position. However, that doesn’t mean you shouldn’t take your eyes off the interviewer. You’re not trying to intimidate them by looking in their eyes without blinking. Keep the eye contact casual and relaxed.     Wrong Posture   Curving your back forward makes you look unconfident. Crossing your arms shows you’re setting limits and you’re not very interested in the discussion. Sitting in a stiff position means you’re not relaxed. You want to sit with your back straight, but shoulders relaxed. A slight lean forward when you talk shows you’re interested in the conversation. Hiring managers pay a lot of attention to these body signs, so you want to leave a good impression through your posture.     Are you ready? You’re ready! If you avoid the mistakes listed above, you’ll do just fine during the interview.    Joan Selby is a content marketer at SuperiorPapers and passionate blogger. Former teacher and fancy shoelover. A writer by day and reader by night. Find her on Twitter and Facebook . You made it! You applied for a job with an awesome resume that highlighted your experience in the military and showed you’re ready for the next step. You got the call you’ve been waiting for. The interview is scheduled soon, so you don’t have much time to prepare. Most people will try to calm you down with the same old advice: “Just be yourself.” Yes, that’s a nice starting point, but you need something more than that. You need to look as a great professional that everyone would want in their company. The resume informed the employer about your training, skills and knowledge. Now, it’s all about character. The impression you make is crucial. The first thing you can do is search for tips on how to make the interviewer fall in love with you . You’ll easily figure out what you need to do: pick a professionally-looking outfit, give them a firm handshake, and stay calm and confident while answering the questions. Let’s take the instructions a bit further today. We’ll go through 12 common mistakes that make veterans look unprofessional at interviews. We’ll also tell you how to avoid those pitfalls.   Being Late   Come on; you were in the military! They expect you to be there right on time. Running late means you have poor management skills. However, being late also shows your disrespect for the organization that invited you for an interview. Of course you don’t want to be late and you do your best to arrive on time. However, you should always consider potential obstacles, such as a messy traffic, an important phone call, or an emergency situation with your family members. Be mentally prepared for the interview. Go to bed early, so you’ll get enough sleep. When you wake up on the day of the interview, repeat to yourself: “nothing will make me late.” Whoever calls you and whatever happens, you shouldn’t be prevented from leaving early for the interview. If there’s an extreme emergency, call the company as soon as possible and ask them to reschedule the interview.   Not Being Ready   You figure you’ll just go with the flow ? You already have what it takes, so you’ll just answer few questions and get that job? You’re wrong. The interviewer will want to see what you know about the company in question. They will ask you how you see yourself in that environment and how you’ll make it better. Make sure to do your research on the organization’s mission, values, and current projects. Just explore the about us page from the official website and you’ll be fine.     Taking Coffee With You   You need that coffee too bad? You don’t need it during the actual interview. If you need the energy, have coffee before you head off to the interview. Getting in there with a cup of coffee in your hand will make you look highly unprofessional.   Too Much or No Makeup   This tip goes for women only: if you wear too much makeup on an interview, you won’t look like a professional. Try to find “behind the scenes” photos from that organization. Observe the style of the women who work there and try to fit in. It’s equally unprofessional to appear there with no makeup at all. That makes you look like you didn’t invest any effort. Here is a safe bet: put minimal makeup on. Cover the dark circles under your eyes, so you won’t look tired. Use high-quality products that won’t melt under the pressure. You might sweat and you don’t want the foundation to melt on you.   Smoking   Don’t smoke before getting in that office. Whether you like it or not, smokers face professional discrimination. Employers prefer non-smokers because they don’t need frequent breaks to nurture a bad habit. Plus, they smell better. No, we’re not saying you have to quit smoking before you start applying for jobs. We’re just saying you shouldn’t smell like cigarettes when you get there.   Too Much Body Language   You might get so nervous during an interview that you’ll be clicking a pen without or scratching your head without even noticing it. You may also shake your legs or explain things with your hands a tad too much. That shows you’re stressed out and not entirely present in the moment. You don’t want to be stiff, but you don’t need too much body language either. Breathe! Control yourself!   Saying Bad Things about Your Previous Employer   Did you just quit a job that was not the right match for you? Did the boss treat you bad? Did you just come out of military because of a bad experience? Don’t talk about it during the interview. We all have horror stories from previous workplaces. The potential employer will be interested in them, but they won’t form a good impression for a person who complains too much. Chances are, you’ll probably get some of these questions:   Why did you quit the military? Why weren’t you satisfied with your previous job?   Just say that you gave everything you had to give during those previous experiences. You felt like those position no longer gave you space for progress, so now you are ready for something better.   Wearing Too Much Perfume   Of course you want to make a good impression with your favorite scent . The right dose of perfume sure makes you look professional. However, it has to be subtle. Do you want to leave the office smelling like you for hours after you leave? No. Pick a subtle scent that doesn’t cause a headache to most people. Be very moderate with it; a single spritz should be enough.   Failing to Respect the Company’s Dress Code   You have to dress for the job you want. That doesn’t mean picking the fanciest pieces from your closet and the most expensive shoes you own. It means dressing in a way that works for that particular organization. If, for example, you’re applying for a position in a non-governmental organization that does a lot of field work, casual style will be okay. You don’t want to wear a suit to such an interview. If, on the other hand, you’re applying for a traditional office job, ditch the baggy clothes and wear something sleek. Try to find out how the people who work there dress. Pick clothes that will fit in that environment, but will still make you feel like yourself.   Interrupting the Interviewer   Maybe they will make wrong conclusions about you and you’ll want to set things straight. Maybe you’ll predict the question before they finish it and you’ll want to cut through the chaise. Don’t do it! Allow the interviewer to finish the sentence before you speak up. Be patient!    Too Much or No Eye Contact   If you don’t make eye contact, you’ll seem like an unconfident person that no one wants in their organization. No eye contact may also convey lack of interest in this particular position. However, that doesn’t mean you shouldn’t take your eyes off the interviewer. You’re not trying to intimidate them by looking in their eyes without blinking. Keep the eye contact casual and relaxed.     Wrong Posture   Curving your back forward makes you look unconfident. Crossing your arms shows you’re setting limits and you’re not very interested in the discussion. Sitting in a stiff position means you’re not relaxed. You want to sit with your back straight, but shoulders relaxed. A slight lean forward when you talk shows you’re interested in the conversation. Hiring managers pay a lot of attention to these body signs, so you want to leave a good impression through your posture.     Are you ready? You’re ready! If you avoid the mistakes listed above, you’ll do just fine during the interview.    Joan Selby is a content marketer at SuperiorPapers and passionate blogger. Former teacher and fancy shoelover. A writer by day and reader by night. Find her on Twitter and Facebook .
There’s no doubt that military members acquire a number of useful and effective skills during their time in service. After separation from the military, however, many veterans may be faced with the difficulty of choosing their new path in life. Though it may not be obvious, military experience offers an excellent segue into medical training. Both fields require many of the same skills and character traits, and there are several reasons that veterans may want to consider careers in healthcare . Opportunities abound Healthcare is one of the most reliable job sectors in our country. Good doctors, nurses, paramedics, laboratory technicians, and other healthcare support jobs are always in demand. The Bureau of Labor Statistics has projected that healthcare will demonstrate the fastest job growth of all industries. Unlike other types of employment, healthcare is one field that can never become obsolete. Veterans have experience with pressure Many of the characteristics that military experience cultivates would serve veterans well in the medical environment. In the ER, the surgical suite, the ICU, or the oncology floor, healthcare workers encounter intense, weighty, and high pressure situations, often with high stakes. Active duty experience can make veterans well-equipped to handle these responsibilities. Healthcare organizations need clinical staff with integrity, leadership, and a strong work ethic; all the character traits that hail from military discipline. Veterans have priority status for certain jobs Healthcare jobs within the government, such as those posted at VA hospitals or base facilities, give preferential hiring to job-seekers who are prior Military. This makes healthcare careers even more appealing to veterans who are considering moving on to new medical careers. Professional development is unlimited Healthcare companies are extremely encouraging of their employees’ upward development. They offer tuition reimbursement, professional counseling, and even some in-hospital classes to further the education of staff. For those who choose the nursing route, RN to BSN and RN to MSN online programs are the norm. This makes professional advancement accessible for RN's while they are still working. Satisfaction is guaranteed It’s not easy taking care of others in their most vulnerable state, but it is well worth the effort. Many veterans know that already. Healthcare is rewarding on so many levels. From the patients whose lives you change to the families that are forever grateful, few careers can offer the level of satisfaction that healthcare does. IF you are a veteran or soon to be one, and are searching for your next adventure in life, why not consult with a health professions program counselor to see if healthcare could be the right option for you?
Soldiers must be willing to put their lives on the line at a moment’s notice in times of war. Even during times of peace, they must make sacrifices, which can mean months or even years away from their families and constant moving and uprooting. In addition to all of this, there is the physical wear and tear on their bodies and the general stress of their overwhelming responsibilities. While there is nothing that could completely repay them for their service, there are a number of industries that try to help veterans out with discounts on goods and services as well as with other benefits. Some of these are fairly common knowledge, while others are less known. Some are advertised, and some must be asked for. It never hurts to ask if there is a military discount because many companies are more than willing to provide one even if it is not their standard policy. Here are five industries that work to put money back in the pockets of veterans as a way of thanking them for their service. The Auto Industry From buying a car to insuring it and keeping it running correctly, the auto industry provides a number of different discounts for veterans and their families. Some of these include: Discounts and special financing plans to help buy or lease a new or used vehicle. Discounts on car rentals whether it is to get to or from deployments and bases or during your vacations after your service has ended. Special offers on accessories for vehicles at a number of retailers. Service discounts, including oil changes, tire rotations, and scheduled or emergency repairs. A number of auto insurance providers offer discounts to veterans . Some of these are general discounts, while others are offered to specific branches of the military. It is important to ask your insurance provider if this discount is offered while shopping for the best rates. Most providers do advertise their military discounts on their websites, but a few do not. The Financial Industry While banking may not seem like an important detail to an active military person, it and so many of the other “small” details of life must still be taken care of, especially if there is a family at home. Bills must still be paid, checks deposited, and other money-related tasks must also be handled. Thankfully, banks and other related financial service agencies offer discounts.   Special bank rates for military veterans and active duty members. This may also include special types of accounts that give better protection against overdrafts and random fees. The GI bill, which most people are familiar with, offers assistance for college education after military service. However, many people may not know that the proceeds of the bill can be transferred to a spouse or to dependents under certain conditions. Veterans may qualify for assistance with tax preparation and filing, with some tax preparation companies even offering to do it for free. The Veterans Association (VA) has long helped veterans to buy or keep their homes through special loans and financing options. There are also credit repair workshops that can help get problems taken care of before they become serious. The VA also keeps a listing of foreclosures that are offered to veterans first so that they can buy homes that are deeply discounted, although they may need repair. The Entertainment Industry Veterans like a good night on the town as much as anyone else, and there are discounts to help them get more bang for their buck. Most restaurants offer military discounts. Some are at limited times or only for certain meals, while others have no restrictions. It never hurts to ask. Some theaters have discount pricing on tickets for veterans and their families, especially for select movies. Amusement parks often offer veteran discounts or have special veteran days with special pricing available. Other discounts include plays, concerts, and other events. Shipping and Storage When a military member is deployed, they rely on mail as one way to stay connected to friends and family. This can be particularly important during the holidays. They must also store some or all of their possessions, especially if they are going to be gone for a long period and are far from their family. There are a number of ways to get discounts on shipping and shipping supplies, especially if you are sending a package or mail to a military member overseas . Storage facilities will often offer discounts or special pricing to military members so that they can safely store their belongings while they are gone. Electronics and Services In addition to mail, military members and veterans rely heavily on computers, phones, and related services to stay in touch with loved ones as well as to handle their day-to-day tasks, especially after they end their service once and for all. Buying a new cell phone or changing cell phone service can come with a discount for military members, both active and veteran, through certain providers. Again, it never hurts to ask if these discounts are offered even if they are not advertised. Some Internet service providers offer monthly discounts on service, while others may offer discounts on connection or waive service fees for installation or repair services. Computer stores may offer discounts on new or rebuilt PCs and laptops. They may also provide service and repairs at discounted prices. We all owe our veterans a great deal for their sacrifices for all of us. When industries acknowledge that sacrifice by offering discounts to put money back in the pockets of veterans, it is a wonderful thing. The key is to make sure veterans are aware of these discounts and taking advantage of them. It never hurts to ask if a veteran’s discount is offered, no matter where you are. These types of deals are not always advertised or listed, which should not stand in the way of veterans getting a little back for all they have given.
Changing your job or your field of work can be quite difficult. Nowadays, the companies are very dynamic, they change from day to day. This dynamism can make the process of finding a suitable job quite long and exhausting. Because of this, people tend to be very skeptical about the recruitment processes used by the companies today. When you want to start applying for jobs, you should consider writing a top notch resume , thus you’ll have better chances of landing the job you want. Here are 5 myths no one told you about resume writing. If you take note of this myths, you can drastically increase your chances of getting hired.   You can use the same resume for different jobs   Most of the persons searching for a job are sending tens of resumes to different companies. This might include companies from different industries and very different jobs. After one or two days of sending tons of resumes, they are wondering why they don’t receive any calls. Every job is different, it has different requirements. The same job can have contrasting requirements in two different companies. You should consider taking a look at each job’s requirements and attributions and you should modify your resume accordingly. A resume adapted to the requirements of each job can increase your chances of getting called .   You should apply for every job and company out there   This is one of the easiest ways of finding a job, but it’s not very efficient. You might end up being called for interviews for very different jobs, but do you see yourself going to those jobs in 5-10 years? When you are applying for a job, you should research it thoroughly. You need to find out everything that is about that job and the company you are sending your resume to. If you don’t feel 100% comfortable with applying for that job, you shouldn’t do it. George C., Resume Writer and Career Coach at Careers Booster said: „ Before sending the resume, stop for a minute and ask yourself - Do I see myself doing this in 10 years? ” If the answer to your question is yes, then you should apply for that job. If the answer is no, you should consider looking for another job. If you are not 100% sure you’ll like it, that job might turn into a nightmare in a few months, it will become very stressful.   The resume alone will get you employed   The resume is a very important part of the recruitment process. It represents the first contact the recruiter will have with you, the first information he’ll find out about you. Many people think that a good resume will get you employed. A top notch resume will boost your chances of obtaining an interview. Once you are called for an interview, you need to sell yourself. If you aren’t able to do that, you might not land that job you like. The best way of ensuring your success is to practice your speech and learn how to adapt to quirky questions. Ask a friend for help and create an interview-like environment in order to get used to the idea of formal speaking and stressful situations. During these mock interviews, you should focus on the most popular questions asked at interviews . By answering them, you can get a feel of how you should speak during your interview and, also, you practice your speech.   Your resume should include all your professional experience   The resume writing process should always start by documenting yourself about the job you want to apply for. You should find out everything there is about that certain job and you should adapt your resume. You might’ve worked for many companies in the past 30 years and the jobs could’ve been in different industries. When you start to write down your resume, you should focus only on the relevant information. If you worked as an intern for an automotive company and now, 30 years later, you apply for a job at an IT&C company, you shouldn’t include that information. Recruiters tend to have short concentration. They will not consider gigantic resumes that include lots of irrelevant information.   Your education does matter   Your education actually matters if you are a fresh grad or if you've got an Ivy-League education. Theoretical knowledge gives you only a small glimpse at what you’ll need to do at brand new job. For ex-military personnel, the relevant past professional experience and practical skills in that certain industry are more important. These activities will give you the upper hand in a recruitment process. “In looking for people to hire, you look for three qualities: integrity, intelligence, and energy.” - Warren Buffett   Conclusion   Searching for a new job can be quite difficult and it might be an exhausting process. When writing your resume, you should do some research about the job you’re are applying for. Once you do that, you should select only the relevant information for that certain job. If you take note of these myths, your job-finding process should be a lot easier. Author's bio: Eva Wislow is a career coach and HR expert from Pittsburgh. She is on a mission to help people find their true calling. Eva finds her inspiration in writing and peace of mind through yoga. Connect with her on Twitter .
Working full-time while attending college can be a strain on the student. You need to work to finance your education, but you also can't neglect your education for your work. The two responsibilities don't have to be treated separately. Your job can help you academically, and your academic accomplishments can help elevate you in the workplace. Your resume is a reflection of you, so use the skills you've developed to show potential employers just how beneficial you would be to their team. Take Some Online Classes Finishing your degree will do wonders for your resume, but you have to complete it first. Listing a pending degree on your resume doesn't look as impressive as a completed degree. It isn't feasible to attend classes on campus while working full time, so online courses are your best option. Online classes offer much more flexibility than traditional classes. You still have deadlines for assignments, but you have a wider window in which to complete those assignments. Many instructors post the assignment schedule at the start of term, which gives you the opportunity to plan around these dates in advance. You can complete each of these assignments on an individual basis whenever you find the time, and you can also knock out several assignments on one of your off days. This kind of flexibility will serve you well in your goal to complete an online bachelors degree . Make Friends with Your Supervisors It can be tempting to only interact with your supervisors when the situation demands it, but these people can do more than just review your job performance. Your supervisors obtained their positions by acquiring valuable job skills, and many of them would like nothing better than to pass those skills on to you. Think of them as potential mentors. If you show an interest in learning more than just the essentials, then they might reward that interest with their time and attention. Supervising employees is hard work, and managers don't want to waste their valuable time on someone that has no drive or ambition. They want to make sure that the time they've devoted to their employees is well spent. Don't waste their time, and they won't waste yours. Ask for More Responsibility You probably already have a heavy work load, but asking for more responsibility can only help you in the long run. Projects and presentations look good on a resume, so ask to be involved in an upcoming project or assignment. If your supervisors aren't confident in your ability to perform independently, ask for the opportunity to shadow the project's team members. The worst that can happen is you waste a few hours. You might be surprised at what you can contribute to a project when given the opportunity. Volunteer Your Skills Volunteer positions always look good on a resume, especially when the volunteer work involves the use of the applicant's work-related skills. For instance, if one of your job responsibilities is typing, you could volunteer to teach a typing class at a tutoring center. If you're a graphic designer, you could volunteer to set up or maintain the website of a local charity. Just because you won't be getting paid for your time doesn't mean that your efforts won't pay off in the long run. A resume isn't just a meaningless piece of paper; it's a sales pitch to potential employers. Your resume is the key to proving yourself to hiring managers. Don't be content with the resume you have, and always be on the lookout for skills and accomplishments that you can add to it. Working hard in school is important, but utilizing what you've learned to succeed in the workplace is just as important.
A free Job Fair showcasing a portion of the full-time and part-time retail, management, corporate, operations, and sales positions to be created by the $1 billion revitalization of Westfield Century City will take place at the property (10250 Santa Monica Boulevard / Level 1 across from Bloomingdale's ) on Sunday, March 5th ( 12-5 pm ) and Monday, March 6th ( 12-6 pm ) .  Doors will open early ( 10:30am-12pm ) on both days for veterans, transitioning service members, members of the Guard and Reserve, and military spouses in partnership with the U.S. Chamber of Commerce Foundation's, Hiring Our Heroes (HOH) initiative. Opening in stages throughout 2017, Westfield Century City will become a beautiful outdoor destination that rewrites the rules of retail in Los Angeles—combining more than 200 luxury, contemporary and influencer designer brands, a new three-level Nordstrom , completely remodeled three-level Bloomingdale's , modern new two-level Macy's , luxurious Equinox fitness club and spa, the West Coast's first Eataly , and an all-new restaurant collection unlike any other in the city. Among the more than 30 retailers and restaurants participating in the two-day Job Fair are:  Eataly, H&M, Banana Republic, Shake Shack, The Container Store, RockSugar Pan Asian Kitchen , and many others. In addition to visiting the many retailers in attendance, job seekers will also be able to take advantage of free services such as resumé (CV) support and training, and a special LinkedIn "Rock Your Profile" seminar. As part of this Job Fair, Westfield's partnership with HOH provides not only dedicated employment opportunities specifically geared to military families, but innovative resources.  HOH will be hosting in-person seminars on both event days.  March 5 th is the "Brunch & Learn," which educates retailers on how to best utilize the military community to fill open positions.  March 6 th is the employment workshop, providing focused support to military job seekers. During the past five years, Hiring our Heroes has hosted some 1,000 hiring events which have resulted in more than 28,000 military veterans and spouses securing jobs.  In addition, HOH has facilitated hundreds of thousands of additional jobs for military veterans and spouses through its other initiatives, programs, and online resources. "We consider it an honor to make this Job Fair available to area residents and to the military veterans whose service to our nation is so deeply appreciated," said William Hecht , Westfield's Chief Operating Officer .  "This event is also an important reminder that the transformation of Westfield Century City is making a valuable contribution to our local economy by creating thousands of new jobs and generating more than $1 billion in economic output for our community." "This event is really about connecting the local community with those really talented workers who are transitioning service members, veterans and military spouses," said HOH President Eric Eversole .  "Our commitment to partner with employers like Westfield sparks monumental shifts in military family employment." Anyone interested in attending the Job Fair can register for free online at:  https://wccjobfair.eventgrid.com . Veterans, transitioning service members, members of the Guard and reserve and military spouses interested in attending the military-only portion of Job Fair, from 10:30am -12pm , can register at www.hiringourheroes.org . Persons seeking additional information can send inquiries to:  wccjobs@westfield.com . ABOUT WESTFIELD CENTURY CITY Westfield Century City is rewriting the rules of retail with a $1 billion transformation intended to create an open-air L.A. escape like no other. Upon project completion, this will be a 1.2 million square foot destination encompassing more than 200 luxury, contemporary and influencer designer brands, a new three-level flagship Nordstrom featuring its latest design concepts, a completely remodeled three-level Bloomingdale's , a modern new two-level Macy's, a luxurious Equinox fitness club and spa, as well as the West Coast's first Eataly.