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It is absolutely amazing how much our military and our veterans do and have done for our country. They continue to serve us daily with a great love for their country. Veterans have a rich history in our country, for which you can read more here , but they are also making history every day out in the workforce. Many vets face challenges when it comes to integrating into the civilian workforce. They have a wide set of skills, and some that simply do not transfer over. For example, Marine Corps engineers like Christopher Pascale (author of War Poems) are great at looking for roadside bombs, but that is not something most interviewers can appreciate in terms of him being a great banker or salesman - two jobs that don't make the list for vets in general. However, there are some terrific jobs for veterans. Teaching Most veterans are comfortable talking in front of crowds. This comes from having to speak up frequently in groups of 30 or more. Some give what are called "hip pocket classes," which are impromptu courses on a subject they have either prepared, or are knowledgeable about, such as patrolling, weapons safety, or how to save for retirement. Government Administration As veterans rise up in the NCO and officer ranks they have to do paperwork. Some makes things more efficient, and others don't. However, they understand that following the process in place is the first step toward being able to understand it, and maybe making it more efficient. While most people would hate government admin work, and would also hate the pay scale this would be different for veterans. Veterans would understand the process, be used to the concept of being in a job that will keep them from being poor - even if they'll never be rich - and will also appreciate benefits like accumulating large amounts of sick and leave time, which starts at a total of 26 days per year! Management With just 1-2 years in the military veterans are given some kind of experience as a fire team leader in charge of 3 other people. What's more, veterans are used to having team members that they cannot fire, and therefore have to help be better. Student After spending between 4-30 years doing many things they may not have wanted to veterans fully embrace the idea of studying what they want in school. Add in the GI Bill that pays their tuition, and then pays them tax-free cash, and the incentive is even bigger. This is likely why veterans have higher GPAs than their classmates. There are many opportunities for veterans in the workforce. While some will make fantastic lawyers, accountants, and engineers we believe these professions will suit them extremely well.
You made it! You applied for a job with an awesome resume that highlighted your experience in the military and showed you’re ready for the next step. You got the call you’ve been waiting for. The interview is scheduled soon, so you don’t have much time to prepare. Most people will try to calm you down with the same old advice: “Just be yourself.” Yes, that’s a nice starting point, but you need something more than that. You need to look as a great professional that everyone would want in their company. The resume informed the employer about your training, skills and knowledge. Now, it’s all about character. The impression you make is crucial. The first thing you can do is search for tips on how to make the interviewer fall in love with you . You’ll easily figure out what you need to do: pick a professionally-looking outfit, give them a firm handshake, and stay calm and confident while answering the questions. Let’s take the instructions a bit further today. We’ll go through 12 common mistakes that make veterans look unprofessional at interviews. We’ll also tell you how to avoid those pitfalls.   Being Late   Come on; you were in the military! They expect you to be there right on time. Running late means you have poor management skills. However, being late also shows your disrespect for the organization that invited you for an interview. Of course you don’t want to be late and you do your best to arrive on time. However, you should always consider potential obstacles, such as a messy traffic, an important phone call, or an emergency situation with your family members. Be mentally prepared for the interview. Go to bed early, so you’ll get enough sleep. When you wake up on the day of the interview, repeat to yourself: “nothing will make me late.” Whoever calls you and whatever happens, you shouldn’t be prevented from leaving early for the interview. If there’s an extreme emergency, call the company as soon as possible and ask them to reschedule the interview.   Not Being Ready   You figure you’ll just go with the flow ? You already have what it takes, so you’ll just answer few questions and get that job? You’re wrong. The interviewer will want to see what you know about the company in question. They will ask you how you see yourself in that environment and how you’ll make it better. Make sure to do your research on the organization’s mission, values, and current projects. Just explore the about us page from the official website and you’ll be fine.     Taking Coffee With You   You need that coffee too bad? You don’t need it during the actual interview. If you need the energy, have coffee before you head off to the interview. Getting in there with a cup of coffee in your hand will make you look highly unprofessional.   Too Much or No Makeup   This tip goes for women only: if you wear too much makeup on an interview, you won’t look like a professional. Try to find “behind the scenes” photos from that organization. Observe the style of the women who work there and try to fit in. It’s equally unprofessional to appear there with no makeup at all. That makes you look like you didn’t invest any effort. Here is a safe bet: put minimal makeup on. Cover the dark circles under your eyes, so you won’t look tired. Use high-quality products that won’t melt under the pressure. You might sweat and you don’t want the foundation to melt on you.   Smoking   Don’t smoke before getting in that office. Whether you like it or not, smokers face professional discrimination. Employers prefer non-smokers because they don’t need frequent breaks to nurture a bad habit. Plus, they smell better. No, we’re not saying you have to quit smoking before you start applying for jobs. We’re just saying you shouldn’t smell like cigarettes when you get there.   Too Much Body Language   You might get so nervous during an interview that you’ll be clicking a pen without or scratching your head without even noticing it. You may also shake your legs or explain things with your hands a tad too much. That shows you’re stressed out and not entirely present in the moment. You don’t want to be stiff, but you don’t need too much body language either. Breathe! Control yourself!   Saying Bad Things about Your Previous Employer   Did you just quit a job that was not the right match for you? Did the boss treat you bad? Did you just come out of military because of a bad experience? Don’t talk about it during the interview. We all have horror stories from previous workplaces. The potential employer will be interested in them, but they won’t form a good impression for a person who complains too much. Chances are, you’ll probably get some of these questions:   Why did you quit the military? Why weren’t you satisfied with your previous job?   Just say that you gave everything you had to give during those previous experiences. You felt like those position no longer gave you space for progress, so now you are ready for something better.   Wearing Too Much Perfume   Of course you want to make a good impression with your favorite scent . The right dose of perfume sure makes you look professional. However, it has to be subtle. Do you want to leave the office smelling like you for hours after you leave? No. Pick a subtle scent that doesn’t cause a headache to most people. Be very moderate with it; a single spritz should be enough.   Failing to Respect the Company’s Dress Code   You have to dress for the job you want. That doesn’t mean picking the fanciest pieces from your closet and the most expensive shoes you own. It means dressing in a way that works for that particular organization. If, for example, you’re applying for a position in a non-governmental organization that does a lot of field work, casual style will be okay. You don’t want to wear a suit to such an interview. If, on the other hand, you’re applying for a traditional office job, ditch the baggy clothes and wear something sleek. Try to find out how the people who work there dress. Pick clothes that will fit in that environment, but will still make you feel like yourself.   Interrupting the Interviewer   Maybe they will make wrong conclusions about you and you’ll want to set things straight. Maybe you’ll predict the question before they finish it and you’ll want to cut through the chaise. Don’t do it! Allow the interviewer to finish the sentence before you speak up. Be patient!    Too Much or No Eye Contact   If you don’t make eye contact, you’ll seem like an unconfident person that no one wants in their organization. No eye contact may also convey lack of interest in this particular position. However, that doesn’t mean you shouldn’t take your eyes off the interviewer. You’re not trying to intimidate them by looking in their eyes without blinking. Keep the eye contact casual and relaxed.     Wrong Posture   Curving your back forward makes you look unconfident. Crossing your arms shows you’re setting limits and you’re not very interested in the discussion. Sitting in a stiff position means you’re not relaxed. You want to sit with your back straight, but shoulders relaxed. A slight lean forward when you talk shows you’re interested in the conversation. Hiring managers pay a lot of attention to these body signs, so you want to leave a good impression through your posture.     Are you ready? You’re ready! If you avoid the mistakes listed above, you’ll do just fine during the interview.    Joan Selby is a content marketer at SuperiorPapers and passionate blogger. Former teacher and fancy shoelover. A writer by day and reader by night. Find her on Twitter and Facebook . You made it! You applied for a job with an awesome resume that highlighted your experience in the military and showed you’re ready for the next step. You got the call you’ve been waiting for. The interview is scheduled soon, so you don’t have much time to prepare. Most people will try to calm you down with the same old advice: “Just be yourself.” Yes, that’s a nice starting point, but you need something more than that. You need to look as a great professional that everyone would want in their company. The resume informed the employer about your training, skills and knowledge. Now, it’s all about character. The impression you make is crucial. The first thing you can do is search for tips on how to make the interviewer fall in love with you . You’ll easily figure out what you need to do: pick a professionally-looking outfit, give them a firm handshake, and stay calm and confident while answering the questions. Let’s take the instructions a bit further today. We’ll go through 12 common mistakes that make veterans look unprofessional at interviews. We’ll also tell you how to avoid those pitfalls.   Being Late   Come on; you were in the military! They expect you to be there right on time. Running late means you have poor management skills. However, being late also shows your disrespect for the organization that invited you for an interview. Of course you don’t want to be late and you do your best to arrive on time. However, you should always consider potential obstacles, such as a messy traffic, an important phone call, or an emergency situation with your family members. Be mentally prepared for the interview. Go to bed early, so you’ll get enough sleep. When you wake up on the day of the interview, repeat to yourself: “nothing will make me late.” Whoever calls you and whatever happens, you shouldn’t be prevented from leaving early for the interview. If there’s an extreme emergency, call the company as soon as possible and ask them to reschedule the interview.   Not Being Ready   You figure you’ll just go with the flow ? You already have what it takes, so you’ll just answer few questions and get that job? You’re wrong. The interviewer will want to see what you know about the company in question. They will ask you how you see yourself in that environment and how you’ll make it better. Make sure to do your research on the organization’s mission, values, and current projects. Just explore the about us page from the official website and you’ll be fine.     Taking Coffee With You   You need that coffee too bad? You don’t need it during the actual interview. If you need the energy, have coffee before you head off to the interview. Getting in there with a cup of coffee in your hand will make you look highly unprofessional.   Too Much or No Makeup   This tip goes for women only: if you wear too much makeup on an interview, you won’t look like a professional. Try to find “behind the scenes” photos from that organization. Observe the style of the women who work there and try to fit in. It’s equally unprofessional to appear there with no makeup at all. That makes you look like you didn’t invest any effort. Here is a safe bet: put minimal makeup on. Cover the dark circles under your eyes, so you won’t look tired. Use high-quality products that won’t melt under the pressure. You might sweat and you don’t want the foundation to melt on you.   Smoking   Don’t smoke before getting in that office. Whether you like it or not, smokers face professional discrimination. Employers prefer non-smokers because they don’t need frequent breaks to nurture a bad habit. Plus, they smell better. No, we’re not saying you have to quit smoking before you start applying for jobs. We’re just saying you shouldn’t smell like cigarettes when you get there.   Too Much Body Language   You might get so nervous during an interview that you’ll be clicking a pen without or scratching your head without even noticing it. You may also shake your legs or explain things with your hands a tad too much. That shows you’re stressed out and not entirely present in the moment. You don’t want to be stiff, but you don’t need too much body language either. Breathe! Control yourself!   Saying Bad Things about Your Previous Employer   Did you just quit a job that was not the right match for you? Did the boss treat you bad? Did you just come out of military because of a bad experience? Don’t talk about it during the interview. We all have horror stories from previous workplaces. The potential employer will be interested in them, but they won’t form a good impression for a person who complains too much. Chances are, you’ll probably get some of these questions:   Why did you quit the military? Why weren’t you satisfied with your previous job?   Just say that you gave everything you had to give during those previous experiences. You felt like those position no longer gave you space for progress, so now you are ready for something better.   Wearing Too Much Perfume   Of course you want to make a good impression with your favorite scent . The right dose of perfume sure makes you look professional. However, it has to be subtle. Do you want to leave the office smelling like you for hours after you leave? No. Pick a subtle scent that doesn’t cause a headache to most people. Be very moderate with it; a single spritz should be enough.   Failing to Respect the Company’s Dress Code   You have to dress for the job you want. That doesn’t mean picking the fanciest pieces from your closet and the most expensive shoes you own. It means dressing in a way that works for that particular organization. If, for example, you’re applying for a position in a non-governmental organization that does a lot of field work, casual style will be okay. You don’t want to wear a suit to such an interview. If, on the other hand, you’re applying for a traditional office job, ditch the baggy clothes and wear something sleek. Try to find out how the people who work there dress. Pick clothes that will fit in that environment, but will still make you feel like yourself.   Interrupting the Interviewer   Maybe they will make wrong conclusions about you and you’ll want to set things straight. Maybe you’ll predict the question before they finish it and you’ll want to cut through the chaise. Don’t do it! Allow the interviewer to finish the sentence before you speak up. Be patient!    Too Much or No Eye Contact   If you don’t make eye contact, you’ll seem like an unconfident person that no one wants in their organization. No eye contact may also convey lack of interest in this particular position. However, that doesn’t mean you shouldn’t take your eyes off the interviewer. You’re not trying to intimidate them by looking in their eyes without blinking. Keep the eye contact casual and relaxed.     Wrong Posture   Curving your back forward makes you look unconfident. Crossing your arms shows you’re setting limits and you’re not very interested in the discussion. Sitting in a stiff position means you’re not relaxed. You want to sit with your back straight, but shoulders relaxed. A slight lean forward when you talk shows you’re interested in the conversation. Hiring managers pay a lot of attention to these body signs, so you want to leave a good impression through your posture.     Are you ready? You’re ready! If you avoid the mistakes listed above, you’ll do just fine during the interview.    Joan Selby is a content marketer at SuperiorPapers and passionate blogger. Former teacher and fancy shoelover. A writer by day and reader by night. Find her on Twitter and Facebook . You made it! You applied for a job with an awesome resume that highlighted your experience in the military and showed you’re ready for the next step. You got the call you’ve been waiting for. The interview is scheduled soon, so you don’t have much time to prepare. Most people will try to calm you down with the same old advice: “Just be yourself.” Yes, that’s a nice starting point, but you need something more than that. You need to look as a great professional that everyone would want in their company. The resume informed the employer about your training, skills and knowledge. Now, it’s all about character. The impression you make is crucial. The first thing you can do is search for tips on how to make the interviewer fall in love with you . You’ll easily figure out what you need to do: pick a professionally-looking outfit, give them a firm handshake, and stay calm and confident while answering the questions. Let’s take the instructions a bit further today. We’ll go through 12 common mistakes that make veterans look unprofessional at interviews. We’ll also tell you how to avoid those pitfalls.   Being Late   Come on; you were in the military! They expect you to be there right on time. Running late means you have poor management skills. However, being late also shows your disrespect for the organization that invited you for an interview. Of course you don’t want to be late and you do your best to arrive on time. However, you should always consider potential obstacles, such as a messy traffic, an important phone call, or an emergency situation with your family members. Be mentally prepared for the interview. Go to bed early, so you’ll get enough sleep. When you wake up on the day of the interview, repeat to yourself: “nothing will make me late.” Whoever calls you and whatever happens, you shouldn’t be prevented from leaving early for the interview. If there’s an extreme emergency, call the company as soon as possible and ask them to reschedule the interview.   Not Being Ready   You figure you’ll just go with the flow ? You already have what it takes, so you’ll just answer few questions and get that job? You’re wrong. The interviewer will want to see what you know about the company in question. They will ask you how you see yourself in that environment and how you’ll make it better. Make sure to do your research on the organization’s mission, values, and current projects. Just explore the about us page from the official website and you’ll be fine.     Taking Coffee With You   You need that coffee too bad? You don’t need it during the actual interview. If you need the energy, have coffee before you head off to the interview. Getting in there with a cup of coffee in your hand will make you look highly unprofessional.   Too Much or No Makeup   This tip goes for women only: if you wear too much makeup on an interview, you won’t look like a professional. Try to find “behind the scenes” photos from that organization. Observe the style of the women who work there and try to fit in. It’s equally unprofessional to appear there with no makeup at all. That makes you look like you didn’t invest any effort. Here is a safe bet: put minimal makeup on. Cover the dark circles under your eyes, so you won’t look tired. Use high-quality products that won’t melt under the pressure. You might sweat and you don’t want the foundation to melt on you.   Smoking   Don’t smoke before getting in that office. Whether you like it or not, smokers face professional discrimination. Employers prefer non-smokers because they don’t need frequent breaks to nurture a bad habit. Plus, they smell better. No, we’re not saying you have to quit smoking before you start applying for jobs. We’re just saying you shouldn’t smell like cigarettes when you get there.   Too Much Body Language   You might get so nervous during an interview that you’ll be clicking a pen without or scratching your head without even noticing it. You may also shake your legs or explain things with your hands a tad too much. That shows you’re stressed out and not entirely present in the moment. You don’t want to be stiff, but you don’t need too much body language either. Breathe! Control yourself!   Saying Bad Things about Your Previous Employer   Did you just quit a job that was not the right match for you? Did the boss treat you bad? Did you just come out of military because of a bad experience? Don’t talk about it during the interview. We all have horror stories from previous workplaces. The potential employer will be interested in them, but they won’t form a good impression for a person who complains too much. Chances are, you’ll probably get some of these questions:   Why did you quit the military? Why weren’t you satisfied with your previous job?   Just say that you gave everything you had to give during those previous experiences. You felt like those position no longer gave you space for progress, so now you are ready for something better.   Wearing Too Much Perfume   Of course you want to make a good impression with your favorite scent . The right dose of perfume sure makes you look professional. However, it has to be subtle. Do you want to leave the office smelling like you for hours after you leave? No. Pick a subtle scent that doesn’t cause a headache to most people. Be very moderate with it; a single spritz should be enough.   Failing to Respect the Company’s Dress Code   You have to dress for the job you want. That doesn’t mean picking the fanciest pieces from your closet and the most expensive shoes you own. It means dressing in a way that works for that particular organization. If, for example, you’re applying for a position in a non-governmental organization that does a lot of field work, casual style will be okay. You don’t want to wear a suit to such an interview. If, on the other hand, you’re applying for a traditional office job, ditch the baggy clothes and wear something sleek. Try to find out how the people who work there dress. Pick clothes that will fit in that environment, but will still make you feel like yourself.   Interrupting the Interviewer   Maybe they will make wrong conclusions about you and you’ll want to set things straight. Maybe you’ll predict the question before they finish it and you’ll want to cut through the chaise. Don’t do it! Allow the interviewer to finish the sentence before you speak up. Be patient!    Too Much or No Eye Contact   If you don’t make eye contact, you’ll seem like an unconfident person that no one wants in their organization. No eye contact may also convey lack of interest in this particular position. However, that doesn’t mean you shouldn’t take your eyes off the interviewer. You’re not trying to intimidate them by looking in their eyes without blinking. Keep the eye contact casual and relaxed.     Wrong Posture   Curving your back forward makes you look unconfident. Crossing your arms shows you’re setting limits and you’re not very interested in the discussion. Sitting in a stiff position means you’re not relaxed. You want to sit with your back straight, but shoulders relaxed. A slight lean forward when you talk shows you’re interested in the conversation. Hiring managers pay a lot of attention to these body signs, so you want to leave a good impression through your posture.     Are you ready? You’re ready! If you avoid the mistakes listed above, you’ll do just fine during the interview.    Joan Selby is a content marketer at SuperiorPapers and passionate blogger. Former teacher and fancy shoelover. A writer by day and reader by night. Find her on Twitter and Facebook .
There’s no doubt that military members acquire a number of useful and effective skills during their time in service. After separation from the military, however, many veterans may be faced with the difficulty of choosing their new path in life. Though it may not be obvious, military experience offers an excellent segue into medical training. Both fields require many of the same skills and character traits, and there are several reasons that veterans may want to consider careers in healthcare . Opportunities abound Healthcare is one of the most reliable job sectors in our country. Good doctors, nurses, paramedics, laboratory technicians, and other healthcare support jobs are always in demand. The Bureau of Labor Statistics has projected that healthcare will demonstrate the fastest job growth of all industries. Unlike other types of employment, healthcare is one field that can never become obsolete. Veterans have experience with pressure Many of the characteristics that military experience cultivates would serve veterans well in the medical environment. In the ER, the surgical suite, the ICU, or the oncology floor, healthcare workers encounter intense, weighty, and high pressure situations, often with high stakes. Active duty experience can make veterans well-equipped to handle these responsibilities. Healthcare organizations need clinical staff with integrity, leadership, and a strong work ethic; all the character traits that hail from military discipline. Veterans have priority status for certain jobs Healthcare jobs within the government, such as those posted at VA hospitals or base facilities, give preferential hiring to job-seekers who are prior Military. This makes healthcare careers even more appealing to veterans who are considering moving on to new medical careers. Professional development is unlimited Healthcare companies are extremely encouraging of their employees’ upward development. They offer tuition reimbursement, professional counseling, and even some in-hospital classes to further the education of staff. For those who choose the nursing route, RN to BSN and RN to MSN online programs are the norm. This makes professional advancement accessible for RN's while they are still working. Satisfaction is guaranteed It’s not easy taking care of others in their most vulnerable state, but it is well worth the effort. Many veterans know that already. Healthcare is rewarding on so many levels. From the patients whose lives you change to the families that are forever grateful, few careers can offer the level of satisfaction that healthcare does. IF you are a veteran or soon to be one, and are searching for your next adventure in life, why not consult with a health professions program counselor to see if healthcare could be the right option for you?
Soldiers must be willing to put their lives on the line at a moment’s notice in times of war. Even during times of peace, they must make sacrifices, which can mean months or even years away from their families and constant moving and uprooting. In addition to all of this, there is the physical wear and tear on their bodies and the general stress of their overwhelming responsibilities. While there is nothing that could completely repay them for their service, there are a number of industries that try to help veterans out with discounts on goods and services as well as with other benefits. Some of these are fairly common knowledge, while others are less known. Some are advertised, and some must be asked for. It never hurts to ask if there is a military discount because many companies are more than willing to provide one even if it is not their standard policy. Here are five industries that work to put money back in the pockets of veterans as a way of thanking them for their service. The Auto Industry From buying a car to insuring it and keeping it running correctly, the auto industry provides a number of different discounts for veterans and their families. Some of these include: Discounts and special financing plans to help buy or lease a new or used vehicle. Discounts on car rentals whether it is to get to or from deployments and bases or during your vacations after your service has ended. Special offers on accessories for vehicles at a number of retailers. Service discounts, including oil changes, tire rotations, and scheduled or emergency repairs. A number of auto insurance providers offer discounts to veterans . Some of these are general discounts, while others are offered to specific branches of the military. It is important to ask your insurance provider if this discount is offered while shopping for the best rates. Most providers do advertise their military discounts on their websites, but a few do not. The Financial Industry While banking may not seem like an important detail to an active military person, it and so many of the other “small” details of life must still be taken care of, especially if there is a family at home. Bills must still be paid, checks deposited, and other money-related tasks must also be handled. Thankfully, banks and other related financial service agencies offer discounts.   Special bank rates for military veterans and active duty members. This may also include special types of accounts that give better protection against overdrafts and random fees. The GI bill, which most people are familiar with, offers assistance for college education after military service. However, many people may not know that the proceeds of the bill can be transferred to a spouse or to dependents under certain conditions. Veterans may qualify for assistance with tax preparation and filing, with some tax preparation companies even offering to do it for free. The Veterans Association (VA) has long helped veterans to buy or keep their homes through special loans and financing options. There are also credit repair workshops that can help get problems taken care of before they become serious. The VA also keeps a listing of foreclosures that are offered to veterans first so that they can buy homes that are deeply discounted, although they may need repair. The Entertainment Industry Veterans like a good night on the town as much as anyone else, and there are discounts to help them get more bang for their buck. Most restaurants offer military discounts. Some are at limited times or only for certain meals, while others have no restrictions. It never hurts to ask. Some theaters have discount pricing on tickets for veterans and their families, especially for select movies. Amusement parks often offer veteran discounts or have special veteran days with special pricing available. Other discounts include plays, concerts, and other events. Shipping and Storage When a military member is deployed, they rely on mail as one way to stay connected to friends and family. This can be particularly important during the holidays. They must also store some or all of their possessions, especially if they are going to be gone for a long period and are far from their family. There are a number of ways to get discounts on shipping and shipping supplies, especially if you are sending a package or mail to a military member overseas . Storage facilities will often offer discounts or special pricing to military members so that they can safely store their belongings while they are gone. Electronics and Services In addition to mail, military members and veterans rely heavily on computers, phones, and related services to stay in touch with loved ones as well as to handle their day-to-day tasks, especially after they end their service once and for all. Buying a new cell phone or changing cell phone service can come with a discount for military members, both active and veteran, through certain providers. Again, it never hurts to ask if these discounts are offered even if they are not advertised. Some Internet service providers offer monthly discounts on service, while others may offer discounts on connection or waive service fees for installation or repair services. Computer stores may offer discounts on new or rebuilt PCs and laptops. They may also provide service and repairs at discounted prices. We all owe our veterans a great deal for their sacrifices for all of us. When industries acknowledge that sacrifice by offering discounts to put money back in the pockets of veterans, it is a wonderful thing. The key is to make sure veterans are aware of these discounts and taking advantage of them. It never hurts to ask if a veteran’s discount is offered, no matter where you are. These types of deals are not always advertised or listed, which should not stand in the way of veterans getting a little back for all they have given.
Changing your job or your field of work can be quite difficult. Nowadays, the companies are very dynamic, they change from day to day. This dynamism can make the process of finding a suitable job quite long and exhausting. Because of this, people tend to be very skeptical about the recruitment processes used by the companies today. When you want to start applying for jobs, you should consider writing a top notch resume , thus you’ll have better chances of landing the job you want. Here are 5 myths no one told you about resume writing. If you take note of this myths, you can drastically increase your chances of getting hired.   You can use the same resume for different jobs   Most of the persons searching for a job are sending tens of resumes to different companies. This might include companies from different industries and very different jobs. After one or two days of sending tons of resumes, they are wondering why they don’t receive any calls. Every job is different, it has different requirements. The same job can have contrasting requirements in two different companies. You should consider taking a look at each job’s requirements and attributions and you should modify your resume accordingly. A resume adapted to the requirements of each job can increase your chances of getting called .   You should apply for every job and company out there   This is one of the easiest ways of finding a job, but it’s not very efficient. You might end up being called for interviews for very different jobs, but do you see yourself going to those jobs in 5-10 years? When you are applying for a job, you should research it thoroughly. You need to find out everything that is about that job and the company you are sending your resume to. If you don’t feel 100% comfortable with applying for that job, you shouldn’t do it. George C., Resume Writer and Career Coach at Careers Booster said: „ Before sending the resume, stop for a minute and ask yourself - Do I see myself doing this in 10 years? ” If the answer to your question is yes, then you should apply for that job. If the answer is no, you should consider looking for another job. If you are not 100% sure you’ll like it, that job might turn into a nightmare in a few months, it will become very stressful.   The resume alone will get you employed   The resume is a very important part of the recruitment process. It represents the first contact the recruiter will have with you, the first information he’ll find out about you. Many people think that a good resume will get you employed. A top notch resume will boost your chances of obtaining an interview. Once you are called for an interview, you need to sell yourself. If you aren’t able to do that, you might not land that job you like. The best way of ensuring your success is to practice your speech and learn how to adapt to quirky questions. Ask a friend for help and create an interview-like environment in order to get used to the idea of formal speaking and stressful situations. During these mock interviews, you should focus on the most popular questions asked at interviews . By answering them, you can get a feel of how you should speak during your interview and, also, you practice your speech.   Your resume should include all your professional experience   The resume writing process should always start by documenting yourself about the job you want to apply for. You should find out everything there is about that certain job and you should adapt your resume. You might’ve worked for many companies in the past 30 years and the jobs could’ve been in different industries. When you start to write down your resume, you should focus only on the relevant information. If you worked as an intern for an automotive company and now, 30 years later, you apply for a job at an IT&C company, you shouldn’t include that information. Recruiters tend to have short concentration. They will not consider gigantic resumes that include lots of irrelevant information.   Your education does matter   Your education actually matters if you are a fresh grad or if you've got an Ivy-League education. Theoretical knowledge gives you only a small glimpse at what you’ll need to do at brand new job. For ex-military personnel, the relevant past professional experience and practical skills in that certain industry are more important. These activities will give you the upper hand in a recruitment process. “In looking for people to hire, you look for three qualities: integrity, intelligence, and energy.” - Warren Buffett   Conclusion   Searching for a new job can be quite difficult and it might be an exhausting process. When writing your resume, you should do some research about the job you’re are applying for. Once you do that, you should select only the relevant information for that certain job. If you take note of these myths, your job-finding process should be a lot easier. Author's bio: Eva Wislow is a career coach and HR expert from Pittsburgh. She is on a mission to help people find their true calling. Eva finds her inspiration in writing and peace of mind through yoga. Connect with her on Twitter .
Working full-time while attending college can be a strain on the student. You need to work to finance your education, but you also can't neglect your education for your work. The two responsibilities don't have to be treated separately. Your job can help you academically, and your academic accomplishments can help elevate you in the workplace. Your resume is a reflection of you, so use the skills you've developed to show potential employers just how beneficial you would be to their team. Take Some Online Classes Finishing your degree will do wonders for your resume, but you have to complete it first. Listing a pending degree on your resume doesn't look as impressive as a completed degree. It isn't feasible to attend classes on campus while working full time, so online courses are your best option. Online classes offer much more flexibility than traditional classes. You still have deadlines for assignments, but you have a wider window in which to complete those assignments. Many instructors post the assignment schedule at the start of term, which gives you the opportunity to plan around these dates in advance. You can complete each of these assignments on an individual basis whenever you find the time, and you can also knock out several assignments on one of your off days. This kind of flexibility will serve you well in your goal to complete an online bachelors degree . Make Friends with Your Supervisors It can be tempting to only interact with your supervisors when the situation demands it, but these people can do more than just review your job performance. Your supervisors obtained their positions by acquiring valuable job skills, and many of them would like nothing better than to pass those skills on to you. Think of them as potential mentors. If you show an interest in learning more than just the essentials, then they might reward that interest with their time and attention. Supervising employees is hard work, and managers don't want to waste their valuable time on someone that has no drive or ambition. They want to make sure that the time they've devoted to their employees is well spent. Don't waste their time, and they won't waste yours. Ask for More Responsibility You probably already have a heavy work load, but asking for more responsibility can only help you in the long run. Projects and presentations look good on a resume, so ask to be involved in an upcoming project or assignment. If your supervisors aren't confident in your ability to perform independently, ask for the opportunity to shadow the project's team members. The worst that can happen is you waste a few hours. You might be surprised at what you can contribute to a project when given the opportunity. Volunteer Your Skills Volunteer positions always look good on a resume, especially when the volunteer work involves the use of the applicant's work-related skills. For instance, if one of your job responsibilities is typing, you could volunteer to teach a typing class at a tutoring center. If you're a graphic designer, you could volunteer to set up or maintain the website of a local charity. Just because you won't be getting paid for your time doesn't mean that your efforts won't pay off in the long run. A resume isn't just a meaningless piece of paper; it's a sales pitch to potential employers. Your resume is the key to proving yourself to hiring managers. Don't be content with the resume you have, and always be on the lookout for skills and accomplishments that you can add to it. Working hard in school is important, but utilizing what you've learned to succeed in the workplace is just as important.
A free Job Fair showcasing a portion of the full-time and part-time retail, management, corporate, operations, and sales positions to be created by the $1 billion revitalization of Westfield Century City will take place at the property (10250 Santa Monica Boulevard / Level 1 across from Bloomingdale's ) on Sunday, March 5th ( 12-5 pm ) and Monday, March 6th ( 12-6 pm ) .  Doors will open early ( 10:30am-12pm ) on both days for veterans, transitioning service members, members of the Guard and Reserve, and military spouses in partnership with the U.S. Chamber of Commerce Foundation's, Hiring Our Heroes (HOH) initiative. Opening in stages throughout 2017, Westfield Century City will become a beautiful outdoor destination that rewrites the rules of retail in Los Angeles—combining more than 200 luxury, contemporary and influencer designer brands, a new three-level Nordstrom , completely remodeled three-level Bloomingdale's , modern new two-level Macy's , luxurious Equinox fitness club and spa, the West Coast's first Eataly , and an all-new restaurant collection unlike any other in the city. Among the more than 30 retailers and restaurants participating in the two-day Job Fair are:  Eataly, H&M, Banana Republic, Shake Shack, The Container Store, RockSugar Pan Asian Kitchen , and many others. In addition to visiting the many retailers in attendance, job seekers will also be able to take advantage of free services such as resumé (CV) support and training, and a special LinkedIn "Rock Your Profile" seminar. As part of this Job Fair, Westfield's partnership with HOH provides not only dedicated employment opportunities specifically geared to military families, but innovative resources.  HOH will be hosting in-person seminars on both event days.  March 5 th is the "Brunch & Learn," which educates retailers on how to best utilize the military community to fill open positions.  March 6 th is the employment workshop, providing focused support to military job seekers. During the past five years, Hiring our Heroes has hosted some 1,000 hiring events which have resulted in more than 28,000 military veterans and spouses securing jobs.  In addition, HOH has facilitated hundreds of thousands of additional jobs for military veterans and spouses through its other initiatives, programs, and online resources. "We consider it an honor to make this Job Fair available to area residents and to the military veterans whose service to our nation is so deeply appreciated," said William Hecht , Westfield's Chief Operating Officer .  "This event is also an important reminder that the transformation of Westfield Century City is making a valuable contribution to our local economy by creating thousands of new jobs and generating more than $1 billion in economic output for our community." "This event is really about connecting the local community with those really talented workers who are transitioning service members, veterans and military spouses," said HOH President Eric Eversole .  "Our commitment to partner with employers like Westfield sparks monumental shifts in military family employment." Anyone interested in attending the Job Fair can register for free online at:  https://wccjobfair.eventgrid.com . Veterans, transitioning service members, members of the Guard and reserve and military spouses interested in attending the military-only portion of Job Fair, from 10:30am -12pm , can register at www.hiringourheroes.org . Persons seeking additional information can send inquiries to:  wccjobs@westfield.com . ABOUT WESTFIELD CENTURY CITY Westfield Century City is rewriting the rules of retail with a $1 billion transformation intended to create an open-air L.A. escape like no other. Upon project completion, this will be a 1.2 million square foot destination encompassing more than 200 luxury, contemporary and influencer designer brands, a new three-level flagship Nordstrom featuring its latest design concepts, a completely remodeled three-level Bloomingdale's , a modern new two-level Macy's, a luxurious Equinox fitness club and spa, as well as the West Coast's first Eataly.
After years of service to our great nation, you have decided to start a career in the civilian world. Making this transition is rather difficult because many things are totally different. Take occupation for example. You need a bachelor’s degree to get a job because many civilian employers require it. You may not have a degree because you have decided to dedicate your life to serving your country. This is a whole different kind of ball game for employers because many of them perceive vets as unable to do civilian jobs. However, bachelor’s degree and military experience have a lot in common; moreover, the latter provides even more training than the former. As the result, it can give you an advantage. To make sure that you use this advantage, read this article and see what should be done. Military experience as source of superior skills for your resume To be better than your competitors, you need to demonstrate that your skills are superior. This shouldn’t be difficult because some of the skills you mastered in the military are indeed far more advanced! First, perseverance . Other candidates survived through college and tested their skills on civilian jobs. That’s good enough, right? Well, did they have a drill sergeant in their faces every day breaking them down? Did they live a tough lifestyle you learned in the military? No, so they don’t know what a real perseverance is. You do, so include this in your resume to stand out. Second, communication skills . Those with degrees know how to present information to the colleagues because they learned this skill in college. You know how to do this too, even better! You have orally briefed senior leaders, wrote countless papers explaining your understanding of complex real-life situations, and wrote reports that synthesized difficult subject matter into presentations for leaders. This requires some serious communication skills as well! Third, teamwork . Many candidates that compete with you to get a job don’t even know how to work in a team. You, on the other hand, performed numerous missions in a team, delegated roles, made critical decisions, and collaborated to get the mission done. Your knowledge on teamwork might be far more advanced than anyone who applies for the same job as you, so include this skill in your resume and let them know what you can do! Fourth, your work ethics may also be more superior. You understand the importance of adhering to the schedule and performing the job consistently better than anyone. Many of your opponents may not share these views and abilities because they have not lived the military lifestyle that values a strong work ethic. Former military members usually perform well on companies like professional writing services where one needs to compete with many other candidates and demonstrate superior work ethics. So, this quality also should be included in your resume. Outline your strengths and be prepared to provide examples in terms of skills, personal qualities, and past experiences. Undoubtedly, your presentation of yourself will be much more convincing to the interviewer if you share concrete examples of how you applied your skills to deliver outstanding results. Learn about the position and connect it to your experience Your career in the military is well-documented through certifications, performance evaluations, and awards. They should be used to your advantage, especially in case they are relevant to the job you are applying for. Think about how to make your experience and training make sense to the interviewer; for example, you can provide awards and other documents you received during the service to show that are good at particular things. So, before you apply for a job, check the skills it requires and see whether you have something to show the interviewer to impress him/her. This evidence can make you relevant to the position, so your chances of getting it will be better. You might also be asked: “why should we hire you?”, so it’s better to be prepared. Think of situations, challenges, or projects in the military that highlight your skills relevant for the job. Select several skills, they will be a core of your answer to this question. Finally, you can use some facts to your advantage. For example, you can say that the current cost incurred to a business sustaining an employee is over $30.00 per hour per employee . This translates into huge costs in both short- and long-term but the employer won’t have to worry about this with you because you have an intrinsic understanding of loyalty and its importance for building a work environment. Therefore, you are a thoughtful long-term investment that can easily outperform other candidates. The Bottom Line Former military members have a lot under their belts, and they can use their past experience to get ahead of the competition. Use the tips given in this article to get that job you want, and let your civilian career be prosperous!
Before I conducted the research for this article, I thought that finding a job for veterans would not be a difficult thing to do since they have all that experience under their belts. However, when I was finished researching, I found that making the transition into the civilian workforce is a big deal for them because they often feel daunted and even scared. Also, I discovered that veterans are perfect candidates for many jobs that require knowledge of teamwork, an ability to work under pressure, and discipline. Making this transition into civilian workforce should not be a scary thing because veterans can make big money using their experience! In this article, I will present the findings of my research and identify top ten most profitable freelance jobs for veterans. Interpreter/Translator (average salary $60,000 for non-certified) Many former military members pick up language skills in the countries where they were stationed. If they learned foreign languages well enough, they can become freelance translators or interpreters after the service is through. Many people have posted their resumes as translators and participated in different freelance projects that involve languages they speak, such as written or verbal translations. A big advantage here is that veterans had the opportunity to experience the culture of the foreign country, so they can speak with proper tone and even with a dialect! Web developer (average salary $71,996) The growth of the web development field provides a lot of freelance projects for everyone interested. Veterans are also well suited for designing websites if they are interested in the technology. Similar to freelance writers, web designers do not need an advanced degree (a couple of months of web design training should be enough) and a lot of resources to begin. Choosing web developer job for veterans is a good idea because the industry is booming! It currently employs more than 250,000 people, says the Bureau of Labor Statistics , and this number is supposed to increase by at least 20,000 by 2020. A perfect time to enter the field, right? Teacher or Tutor (average salary $15.03 per hour) This one is pretty simple. If you have an advanced expertise in something, you can teach it to others. All you need to have is lesson plans and a computer with an Internet connection. The expertise that can be taught can be various, from high school math to Mandarin. Mobile app developer (average salary $78,232) Another profitable career from the area of web development. You will need to learn some good training for it, though. However, after several months of learning, you will enter a fascinating area that always needs new talent and fresh ideas. Typical job descriptions include development and testing of mobile apps for various platforms, such as iOS and Android. This job could be a perfect for you in case you have a passion for apps with awesome functions. Web researcher (average salary $57,000) This freelance job is also relatively simple and requires extensive Internet research of topics provided by the employer. Many web researchers work from home and earn a pretty decent salary. Another plus is that popular job boards like Indeed.com have a long list of offers for anyone interested in getting involved with this job. Photographer (average salary $25.54 per hour) If you have an interest in photography, then you should definitely become a freelance photographer. Most of these professionals report very high levels of job satisfaction because they have lots of fun during the photo sessions! For you as a former military member, this can be an interesting change of pace and exciting opportunity to communicate and enjoy the company of others. If you’re interested, here is the job description, tasks, career paths, job listings, and other useful information from Payscale . Customer Service Specialist (average salary $14.22 per hour) This occupation is not as popular as the ones mentioned above but it still pays very well. It could be a good option for you if you feel the need for communication (you are going to do a lot of talking, that’s for sure). According to Payscale , people who are engaged in this field don’t have a lot of years of experience, so veterans with limited or no experience will be gladly accepted. This occupation also offers many different career paths, such as office manager and executive secretary. Logo designer (average salary $48,140) Another good career option for those who love design because these professionals use illustrations, fonts, colors, and layout to visually communicate a message or a product . There are many freelance opportunities available on the Internet for those who prefer to work from home as independent contractors on a per-project basis. Check out this logo design guide to get the idea of what needs to be done here. Writer (average salary $24.62 per hour) Another area great for veterans is freelance writing. It requires a computer, an Internet connection, and willingness to work. Although some writing education should be obtained, it does not require a lot of time to start working. Veterans can find many writing projects online writing blog posts, how-to articles, and product descriptions. Also, if you are good at writing college papers , you may consider professional essay writing service as a variant. There are many freelance writing jobs available on the Internet, so don’t hesitate to apply if you are a former military member. Social media manager (average salary $51,613) The responsibilities of these professionals include facilitation of social media tasks, communication with vendors and customers, and management of social media profiles. This job can easily be done from home because only a computer with an Internet connection is required. Conclusion Feel free to browse through all these career opportunities and make sure that your future occupation perfectly fits your character and passion. There are many opportunities for veterans out there, so get involved!
If you are a veteran who is looking for a job opening, you have probably asked yourself one question: what makes me special when compared with other candidates with different backgrounds? You also might be thinking that other people may have more experience than you because your primary occupation for the past years was military-related. Well, you should not worry much because you have many advantages over others just because of your occupation. Read below to know about them. Any self-respecting individual who works in the field of HR will tell you that in order to be selected for the job, you need to include your special traits in the resume. The ones that are relevant to the job and the ones that the employer is looking for in the candidates. Veterans are people who have a lot of such traits because they acquired specialized skills in the military and developed attributes that make them more desirable on many jobs. You are different and special in many ways, including the ones below, so make sure you include them in your resume today: You know teamwork The business world values people who know how to work as a team, so many companies are looking for these candidates. Teamwork is important because it ensures efficiency, proper delegation, more ideas, and support – all of which are incredibly useful for achieving business goals. Not so many employees out there know how to work as a team. You know who does? That’s right, you! This is something you have been learning and practicing for years in the military. You relied on other team members to complete complex tasks, delegated, and collaborated to achieve success. That’s why you should put teamwork on your resume as one of your best skills. You won’t believe how many employers are looking for those who can really make it work in business. You know how to be cool in stressful situations As a veteran, you have been subjected to numerous stressful situations and had limited resources to solve them. As the result, you have developed almost a natural ability to perform your job even if the pressure on you is unbelievable. I personally heard about a veteran who was employed at an admission-service as a customer support member and handled calls and messages way better than other employees. Most of the people do not even imagine the stress and pressure you faced, so adding this to your resume is a must! If an employer sees this ability in your resume, he or she will most likely to think that your ability to handle pressure is superior compared to many others. This means that you should be hired because you are less likely to crack when faced with a lot of work and short deadlines. You know how to be truly professional Many people do not share the same kind of discipline with you, so their attitude toward workplace is also different. In some cases, employees make a mistake by assuming if a workplace has a friendly atmosphere they can get away with immature jokes and other unprofessional things. The outcome of this behavior might be not so funny because it can lead to interpersonal conflict or maybe even a lawsuit . Employers understand that they will not experience this kind of problems if they hire veterans. Unprofessionalism and immaturity are not really your things because you appreciate discipline and comfortable working environment. You know how to lead This is one of the most important things that can give a really good advantage over other candidates! Team leader, platoon leader, group leader - veterans are natural leaders because they have been living this way for a long time in the military. As the result, they have developed great leadership abilities that cannot be learned some other way. Employers should understand that your personality is best suited for the job because you know to take orders and when to give them. This translates into a team-oriented working environment, which is so desired by many companies! Think of Colin Powell and Ronald Reagan – they came out of the military and reached their goals with their superior leadership skills. You are tenacious Being called a tenacious person in business is a good thing because it means that you are a type of person who never gives up and never stops trying. Many people viewed Steve Jobs as one of the best examples of tenacious persons in the business. Your toughness and tenacity learned in the military may serve well for employers and yourself, so include this trait in the resume as well. Useful Tools Well, now you know how special you are if compared to other job seekers, why not take advantage of your skills? Here are some great websites for you to get started: Wisestamp – Do you know that having an email signature with links to your online profiles and contact details could improve your chances to be considerate as a candidate? Try this tool and create your own signature. Live Career – resume builder, examples, and templates for veterans My Interview Simulator – is an online interview tool which could be used for practicing before having a real interview. Emergencyessays.com – This writing service is known for providing a reliable and professional help with CV writing.